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ApaI VDR Polymorphism as a Risk Factor of Treatment Failure in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

ApaI VDR Polymorphism as a Risk Factor of Treatment Failure in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

Noora Hassan Hezam Al-Aqmer1*, Zain Aamir2, Muhammad Farooq Hanif3, Soumble Zulfiqar4, Sibgha Zulfiqar1, Mateen Izhar5 and Abdul Rauf Shakoori4*

1Department of Physiology, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Shaikh Zayed Medical Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
2Primary and Secondary Healthcare Department, Lahore, Pakistan
3Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pakistan Kidney and Liver Institute and Research Center, Lahore, Pakistan
4School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
5Department of Microbiology, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Shaikh Zayed Medical Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
 
* Corresponding author: arshakoori.sbs@pu.edu.pk, drnooraalaqmer@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to find out the association between ApaI vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism and the response to hepatitis C directly acting antiviral treatment. This study which is a case control study included 66 hepatitis C patients (genotype 3) who responded to the directly acting antiviral treatment and achieved negative HCV-RNA three months after completing the treatment (sustained virologic response (SVR)) and 66 hepatitis C patients (genotype 3) who did not achieve SVR three months after completing the same treatment. Informed consent was taken from participants, demographic data was collected, and 5 mL of blood was drawn from each participant and used for DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. After restriction, samples were run on 2% agarose gel followed by visualization under UV light. Data analysis was done using IBM SPSS 24. We found that the distribution of ApaI genotypes was 28 (42.4%), 27 (40.9%), and 11 (16.7%) for the genotypes AA, Aa, and aa in responders and 22 (33.3%), 26 (39.4%), and 18 (27.3%) in non-responders. The allelic distribution was 83 (62.9%) and 49 (37.1%) for the “A” and “a” alleles in responders and 70 (53%) and 62 (47%) in non-responders. ApaI genotype ‘’aa’’ was found to be a significant predictor of treatment failure (p-value= .024, OR= 3.589, 95% CI= 1.181-10.911). There was no significant association between ApaI VDR genotypes and cirrhosis and ApaI VDR genotypes and gender (p-values ˂ .05). To conclude ApaI genotype aa could be used as a marker to predict treatment failure in hepatitis C patients receiving directly acting antiviral treatment.

 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

August

Vol. 54, Iss. 4, Pages 1501-2001

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